Baraka - a film by Ron Fricke

I had heard about this film several years ago but never got the opportunity to view it. Recently I read about it, and although it was filmed in 1992, it really is timeless...and it arrived in my mailbox today.

Baraka is an incredible nonverbal film containing images of 24 countries from 6 continents, created by Ron Fricke and Mark Magidson, and the most incredible music from Michael Stearns.

The film has no plot, contains no actors and has no script. It simply presents nature, humanity and humanity affect on nature. High quality 70mm images show some of the best, and worse, parts of nature and human life. Timelapse is used heavily to show everyday life from a different perspective. It took a 3-man crew, 14 months to shot this film in 24 countries.

And... I've never seen anything like this... and I can see why many consider this a spiritual film. You might gain a better understanding about how we all interconnect with each other.

Some of the visual images you will see are Tibetan monks, Orthodox Jews, Whirling Dervishes, a solar eclipse, Buddhist monks, African tribal rituals, Jerusalem's Wailing Wall, rain forests, Ayers Rock, Big Sur country, Hawaiian volcanoes, Brazilian slums, time-lapse footage of car and pedestrian traffic, post-Persian Gulf War shots of Kuwait's burning oil fields, burning-of-the-dead ceremonies on the Ganges, refuse dumps of Calcutta, Auschwitz, Egyptian Pyramids, Angkor Wat, Mount Everest, Tuol Sleng in Cambodia, and Indonesian factory workers.

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This is definitely a film I would recommend and a film the entire family can watch. I would love to hear what you thought about the film.

Comments

Melissa said…
This movie looks pretty good Angela. We'll have to check it out!
Sandy said…
This sounds so interesting. I'll check it out and if I do see it I'll drop a comment. I found you from your dad's bird blog.

sandy
Kate I said…
Thanks for dropping by my blog...and your name is in "the hat"!
I absolutely love Baraka...one of my all time favourite movies. You're right, it's timeless and has big impact.

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